Paul Fletcher MP

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Thursday, 04 December 2014 00:00

Interview with Neil Mitchell on 3AW Melbourne

NEIL MITCHELL:

Today I mentioned I found a pile of offensive Facebook pages, one targeting the police in a very nasty way, advocating assaults on women – there are all sorts of nasty anti-Islamic stuff out there. One of the areas that worries me about cyberspace is the unaccountability of the organisations, like Facebook, that allow this stuff. And then there’s bullying, cyber bullying. We’ve seen that leading to suicides. Are your kids victims of cyber bullying, internet bullying, Facebook bullying; are you, for that matter? I reckon we get an email a day with complaints about a Facebook page. Anti-trolling legislation will be introduced into the parliament today which at last will make someone accountable for what is happening here. We’ll get some advice on it later from our psychologist, Michael Carr-Gregg, but on the line, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Communications, Paul Fletcher. Good morning.

In a big step towards Australian children being better protected against cyberbullying and safer when they go online, the Enhancing Online Safety for Children Bill 2014 was today introduced in the Commonwealth Parliament by Paul Fletcher MP, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Communications.

“This is about delivering on our election promise to enhance online safety for children” said Mr Fletcher.

“With research showing that one in five Australian children are the victims of cyber-bullying, this Bill brings powerful new tools to help keep children safe online.”

Why should Australian policymakers care about crowdfunding – the use of the internet to raise funds for new projects or business ventures, often involving relatively small amounts raised from large numbers of people?

One reason is that other countries are establishing streamlined regulatory regimes to permit crowdfunding – removing or simplifying the normal prospectus requirements which would otherwise impede or prevent its occurrence.  For example, New Zealand legalised crowdfunding in April and other countries like the US, UK and Canada have recently changed their laws to permit it.[1]

Last year one in five young Australians aged eight to 17 faced cyberbullying, according to recent research led by the University of New South Wale's Social Policy Research Centre.

Nearly three quarters of Australian schools reported incidents of cyberbullying.

None of this is news to the many Australian families that have been touched by cyberbullying.

They already know what the research confirmed: cyberbullying can be very serious and its consequences can be more far-reaching than bullying in the schoolyard. 

CHRIS UHLMANN: Social media sites will be targeted under plans by the Abbott Government to crack down on the cyber bullying of children.

The Government will today introduce a bill into Parliament to appoint a commissioner with the power to order large social media services and individuals to remove offensive material posted online. 

Technology companies face fines of $17,000 a day if material targeting a child is not removed, and individuals face legal action under existing laws. 

Wednesday, 03 December 2014 00:00

ABC 774 Morning News Melbourne

Wednesday, 03 December 2014 00:00

Herald Sun: $17k fine to deter foul trolls

Social media giants such as Facebook and Instagram will face fines of up to $17,000 a day if they repeatedly refuse to take down offensive and harassing material directed at Aussie children.

The anti-trolling legislation will be introduced today by the Federal Government, which will create an authority to fight cyber-bullying.

Wednesday, 03 December 2014 00:00

Cairns Post: Cyber laws to hit big firms

SOCIAL media giants such as Facebook and Instagram will face fines of up to $17,000 a day if they repeatedly refuse to take down offensive and harassing material directed at Aussie kids.

The anti-trolling legislation will be introduced today by the Federal Government, which will create a new authority to fight cyber bullying.

The office of the Children's E-Safety Commissioner will be empowered to demand social media organisations silence cyber bullies by taking down offensive content which is directed at kids.

Wednesday, 03 December 2014 00:00

Courier Mail: Sites to pay for hosting bullies

SOCIAL media giants such as Facebook and Instagram will face fines of up to $17,000 a day if they refuse to take down offensive and harassing material directed at Australian children.

The anti-trolling legislation will be introduced today by the Federal Government, which will create a new authority to fight cyber-bullying.

Wednesday, 03 December 2014 00:00

Hobart Mercury: Facebook feels heat on bullies

SOCIAL media giants such as Facebook and Instagram will face fines of up to $17,000 a day if they repeatedly refuse to take down offensive and harassing material directed at Aussie kids.

The anti-trolling legislation will be introduced today by the Federal Government, which will create a new authority to fight cyber-bullying.

Authorised by Paul Fletcher MP, Level 2, 280 Pacific Highway Lindfield NSW 2070.

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